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C K Sunila

Jun 15, 2016
10:15

Member


1 |

Interesting concept if you can take care of the following concerns you can improve further.

  1. The rate of evaporation is directly proportional to surface area meaning if the wood is exposed to more air the better, in this case it is in closed chamber so not much moisture can be removed.
  2. The firewood might get charred and covered in soot making it difficult to burn while using again for cooking.
  3. Fire wood might get stuck in the chimney, natural firewood has varying dimensions and it needs to be chopped into smaller bits to fit inside the proposed chimney and getting it out might be difficult.
  4. It will be better to have a portable design currently it looks like it need a metal or a brick stand to hold it in place. So that people can use it indoor also.
  5. Since you have blocked a large portion of exhaust chimney with dry wood, you might need to have some additional exhaust port because smoke might accumulate since smoke cannot escape by natural draught.

Climate Rescue

Jun 20, 2016
07:45

Member


2 |
Proposal
creator

Thanks for your helpful questions.

 

  1. The drying chimney is not a closed chamber; there are vents for moist air to escape near the base. 
  2. If overdried (below 0% moisture) charring is possible. However any charred or part-charred wood is actually easier to burn not harder. 
  3. I cut the wood to fit my cookers before drying (to 4 to 6" length, max 2" wide) and have never had wood get stuck during many uses.
  4. The unit should not be used indoors due to the steamy emissions. I use mine in the open but a simple rain shelter would help in case of daily use. 
  5. The unit is for use with wet not dry wood. The emissions are steamy not smoky. The wood doesn't block the exhaust vents and emissions can escape by natural draft. 

 

Let me know any other questions :-)


Ajis Hidayat

Jun 29, 2016
03:07

Member


3 |

Pia Jensen

Jul 26, 2016
05:11

Member


4 |

Everything I've studied about Rocket stoves and creating 'better" dry wood supplies tells me this is the project to support, especially considering the lack of resource abundance in third world countries. While a former gas tank may appear to be the best solution - the fact is that gas tanks are very expensive in third world countries. Yes, I cal them third world countries.I have lived in several in recent years. They are not developing countries as some would have you believe. A gas tank costs a lot of money - people barely gave enough money for food. Most use wood to cook.

The solution described here is the best solution and deserves your votes. Besides being a great cook stove - it provides biochar for improving soil. It's a win - win solution all the way around.


Pia Jensen

Jul 26, 2016
05:26

Member


5 |

Sorry for the typos above - I have a heavy cast on a broken wrist.

Edited version:

Everything I've studied about Rocket stoves and creating 'better" dry wood supplies tells me this is the project to support, especially considering the lack of resource abundance in third world countries. While a former gas tank may appear to be the best solution - the fact is that gas tanks are very expensive in third world countries. Yes, I call them third world countries.I have lived in several in recent years. They are not developing countries as some would have you believe. A gas tank costs a lot of money - people barely have enough money for food. Most use wood to cook.

The solution described here is the best solution and deserves your votes. Besides being a great cook stove - it provides biochar for improving soil. It's a win - win solution all the way around.

 


Climate Rescue

Jul 27, 2016
04:36

Member


6 |
Proposal
creator

Yes, used gas tanks are also expensive in the UK! 

My proposal is just for the drying chimney to prepare firewood for cookstoves - but I talk about biochar cookstoves as an add-on. The competing proposal is for an unbuilt cookstove design - with ideas about drying wood as an add-on. They may not be aware that the radiant heat from cookstoves has a tiny lateral reach. If their cookstove worked it would be good for drying only twigs!


Doudou Sy

Jul 28, 2016
04:41

Member


7 |

Thank u so much James for helping community and people and Nation concerned by climate change issues and helping people in less developed countries having access to cooking energy.

During my recent visit in Senegal, exactly in Thies (80 Miles from Dakar), people i met specially women, expressed to me their demand and hope to be able one day to build and use your creative technology, specially the climate rescue cookstove

I will stand with u to make it happen

thank u so much James for your work


Pia Jensen

Jul 28, 2016
07:58

Member


8 |

James, thank you clarifying the design (I wasn't "separating" the two unique parts in my thinking). And, by the way, Juan Lemos finished his first Rocket Stove, he sent one picture but it doesn't show the full unit. I'll ask him for a couple more shots/different angles.


Climate Rescue

Jul 30, 2016
05:07

Member


9 |
Proposal
creator

Very grateful Doudou for your super support and vote! Your discussions in Senegal were a big boost to our biochar cookstove project. The instructions for our international pilots are almost ready so you can build one for yourself very soon!

Great news pj! It will be really useful to learn how you and Juan find the different experiences of a rocketstove and biochar cookstove. Hopefully the biochar will be valuable for your gardens.

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